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The Basilica of Saint Peter (Basilica di San Pietro), Vatican

June 25th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

The Basilica of Saint Peter (Basilica di San Pietro), VATICAN

The Basilica of Saint Peter, officially known in Italian as the Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano and colloquially called Saint Peter's Basilica, ranks second among the five major basilicas of Rome and its Vatican City enclave. The largest church in Christianity, it covers an area of 23,000 m² and has a capacity of over 60,000 people. One of the holiest sites of Christendom, it is believed to be the site of crucifixion and burial of the basilica namesake Saint Peter, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and first Bishop of Antioch and later first Bishop of Rome. Tradition holds that his tomb is below the baldochino and altar. Popes have been buried there, too. Construction of the basilica began in 1506 and was completed in 1626.

Contrary to popular belief, the basilica does not hold the distinction in the Roman Catholic Church of being the ecumenical motherchurch, as it is not the cathedral of the Pope (in fact, it is not a cathedral at all). That distinction belongs to the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano. However, due to the proximity of the Papal residence, most Papal ceremonies take place at St. Peter's. The basilica also holds a relic of the Cathedra Petri, the episcopal throne of the basilica's namesake when he led the Roman church, but which is no longer used. These are the sources of the confusion.

(Source: Wikipedia)


Forest Opera, Sopot, Poland

June 24th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Forest Opera, Sopot, POLAND


“Zieleniak” building in Gdansk, Poland

June 24th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

"Zieleniak" building in Gdansk, POLAND

Landmark in center of Gdanska. "Computer network city center"


Jahrhunderthalle in (Breslau), Wroclaw , Poland

June 23rd, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Jahrhunderthalle in (Breslau), Wroclaw , Poland


St. Mary’s Church, Gdansk, Poland

June 23rd, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

St. Mary's Church, Gdansk, POLAND

St. Mary's Church (Polish: Bazylika Mariacka, German: Marienkirche) in Gdańsk is the largest brick church in the world, and one of the largest Gothic buildings in Europe. It is 105.5 m long, and the nave is 66 m wide. Inside the church is room for 25,000 people. It is an aisled hall church with a transept.

Initially the site of the church was occupied by a six-span basilica with a low turret, erected between 1343 and 1360. Parts of the pillars and lower levels of the turret are preserved from this building.

In 1379 a masonry master Henryk Ungeradin with his team started construction work on the present church. By 1447 the eastern part of the temple was finished, and the tower was raised by two floors in the years 1452-1466.

Since 1485 the works were carried over by Hans Brandt, who supervised the erection of the main nave core. The works were finally finished after 1496 under Heinrich Haetzl, who supervised the construction of the vaulting.

Until 20th century both the church interior and exterior were well preserved. The church was severely damaged in World War II, during the storming of the city by the Red Army in March 1945. The wooden roof burned completely and most of the ceiling fell in. 14 of the large vaults collapsed. The windows were utterly destroyed. In places the heat was so intense that some of the bricks simply melted, especially in the upper parts of the tower which acted as a giant chimney. The floor of the church containing priceless gravestone slabs was torn apart, allegedly by Soviet soldiers attempting to loot the corpses buried underneath.

Fortunately, most of the artworks from the interior survived, as they were evacuated for safekeeping to the villages surrounding the city. Many of these have returned to the church, but some are displayed in various museums around Poland. Efforts are underway to secure their return.

The reconstruction started shortly after the war in 1946. The roof was rebuilt in August, 1947. After the basic reconstruction was finished, the church was reconsecrated on 17 November 1955. The reconstruction and renovation of the interior is an ongoing effort and continues to this day.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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Palace of Culture and Sciences in Warsaw, Poland

June 23rd, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Palace of Culture and Sciences in Warsaw, POLAND (in polish: Pałac Kultury i Nauki w Warszawie)

Heritage of comunism in POLAND


“Falowiec” in Gdansk, Poland

June 23rd, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

"Falowiec" in Gdansku, POLAND

Probably the longest building in Europe.


St. Mary’s Church, Cracow, Poland

June 22nd, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

St. Mary's Church, Cracow, Poland

St. Mary's Basilica is a Gothic church built in the 14th century adjacent to the main market square of Kraków, Poland. It is particularly famous for its wooden altar carved by Veit Stoss. On every hour, a trumpet signal called the hejnał is played from the top of the taller of St. Mary's two towers. The plaintive tune breaks off mid-bar, to commemorate a famous 13th century trumpeter, who was shot in the throat while sounding the alarm before a Mongol invasion. The noon hejnał is heard across Poland and abroad, broadcast live over the Polish Radio 1 national radio broadcaster.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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