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The Bridge of the Americas. Panama

April 6th, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

The Bridge of the Americas (Spanish: Puente de las Américas; originally known as the Thatcher Ferry Bridge) is a road bridge in Panama, which spans the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal. Built in 1962, at a cost of US$20 million, it was the only non-swinging bridge (there are two other bridges, one at Miraflores locks and one at Gatun locks) connecting the north and south American land masses until the opening of the Centennial Bridge in 2004.

The Bridge of the Americas crosses the Pacific approach to the Panama Canal at Balboa, near Panama City. It was built between 1959 and 1962 by the United States at a cost of 20 million U.S. dollars.

The bridge is a truss arch design, with a length of 1,654 m (5,425 ft) in 14 spans, abutment to abutment; the main span measures 344 m (1,128 ft). The highest point of the bridge is 117 m (384 ft) above mean sea level; the clearance under the main span is 61.3 m (201 ft) at high tide. There are wide access ramps at each end, and a pedestrian walkway on each side.

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Closed Swing Bridge, Sydney, Australia

April 2nd, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Closed (maintenance) Swing Bridge in Sydney, Australia

Send by: Jeronimo


Pyrmont Bridge, Sydney, Australia

April 2nd, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Pyrmont Bridge - a pedestrian and Sydney Monorail crossing of Darling Harbour near central Sydney. The still-operational swing span was one of the first to be electrically powered.

The Pyrmont Bridge is a swing bridge over Cockle Bay in Darling Harbour (part of Sydney Harbour) in Sydney, Australia.

The foundation stone was laid on 6 December 1899 by the Hon. E. W. O'Sullivan and the bridge was opened for traffic on 28 June 1902 by the Governor of New South Wales, His Excellency Sir Harry Holdsworth Rawson KGB.

The engineer was Percy Allan (1861–1930). The bridge had one of the largest swing spans in the world and it was one of the first to be powered by electricity.

Engineers Australia has recognized the bridge as a National Engineering Landmark.

The bridge was closed to vehicular traffic in the 1980s, the traffic having been diverted over new freeway structures built further south of Cockle Bay, and it was then re-opened as a pedestrian bridge as part of the re-development of Darling Harbour as a recreational pedestrian precinct. It now also carries an elevated monorail which travels between Darling Harbour and the Sydney central business district.

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Kobe bridge, Kobe, Japan

March 31st, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Kobe bridge in Kobe, Japan

Send by: kuba


Train bridges, Tokyo, Japan

March 31st, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Three train bridges in Tokyo, Japan

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The Thomas Viaduct, Maryland, USA

March 27th, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

The Thomas Viaduct, originally nicknamed Latrobe's Folly, spans the Patapsco River between Relay and Elkridge, Maryland. Constructed between 1833 and 1835, it is the first multi-span masonry railroad bridge in the United States and the first to be built on a curving alignment. The Thomas Viaduct was the largest bridge in the nation in its day, and was named for Philip E. Thomas, first president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). The viaduct is still in use today, owned by CSX Transportation, and is the world's oldest multiple stone arched railroad bridge.

The stone, Roman-arch bridge is divided into eight spans. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, II, then B&O assistant engineer, later chief engineer. It was built by John McCartney of Ohio under the supervision of Caspar Wever, the road's chief of construction. McCartney received the contract after the successful completion of the Patterson Viaduct. The main design problem to be overcome was that of construction on a curve: there would be variations in span and pier width between the opposite sides of the structure. This problem was solved by having the lateral pier faces laid out on radial lines, thus making the piers essentially wedge-shaped, and fitted to the 4 degree curve.

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Entrance to Tokyo Bay AquaLine, Tokyo, Japan

March 27th, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

Entrance to Tokyo Bay AquaLine, Tokyo, Japan

The Tokyo Bay Aqua-Line is a bridge-tunnel-combination across Tokyo Bay in Japan. It connects the city of Kawasaki in Kanagawa Prefecture with the city of Kisarazu in Chiba Prefecture. With an overall length of 14 km, it includes a 4.4 km bridge and 9.6 km tunnel underneath the bay - which is the longest underwater tunnel for cars in the world.

At the bridge-tunnel crossover point, there is an artificial island called the "Umi-hotaru (海ほたる, engl. sea firefly)" with a rest area as well as the usual restaurants, shops and amusement facilities. The characteristic wind tower Kaze no tō (風の塔) in the middle of the tunnel is used to pump air into the tunnel.

The road carries National Route 409 across the bay. It opened on December 18, 1997 after 31 years of construction at a cost of 1.44 trillion yen (11.2 billion USD at the time of opening). With the Tokyo Wan Aqualine the drive from the most important industrial regions Chiba and Kanagawa is reduced to 15 minutes. Before it was opened one had to drive a 100km long way along the Tokyo Bay which automatically leads through the center of Tokyo. One aim during the planning of the Aqualine was to reduce the traffic through the center of Tokyo, but as the highway toll is still quite high at 3,700 Yen, this effect doesn't take place as strong as expected.

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Magdeburg Water Bridge, Germany

March 20th, 2007 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

The 918-metre Magdeburg Water Bridge or Wasserstrassenkreuz in German, (52°13′50″N, 11°42′4″E), completed in October 2003, connects two important German shipping canals, the Elbe-Havel Canal and the Mittellandkanal, which leads to the country’s industrial Ruhr Valley heartland.

Engineers first conceived of joining the two waterways as far back as 1919 and by 1938 the Rothensee lock and bridge anchors were in place but construction was postponed during World War II. After the Cold War split Germany, the project was put on hold indefinitely by the East German government. With the reunification of Germany and the following establishment of major projects in transport tracks the Water Bridge again became a priority.

Construction began in 1997 and after six years and around half a billion euros the gigantic water bridge now connects Berlin’s inland harbour with the ports along the Rhine river. The huge tub created to transport ships over the Elbe took 24,000 metric tons of steel and 68,000 cubic meters of concrete to build.

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