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Temple of Artemis, Turkey

December 6th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

The Temple of Artemis (Greek: Artemision; Latin: Artemisium) was a Greek temple dedicated to Artemis completed around 550 BCE at Ephesus in present-day Turkey) under the Achaemenid dynasty of the Persian Empire. Nothing remains of the original temple, which was considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

The temple was a 120-year project started by Croesus of Lydia.

The Temple of Artemis was located in the ancient city of Ephesus, about 50 km south from the modern port city of Izmir, in Turkey. Like the other wonders, Antipater chose the temple for his list not because of its beauty or size, but rather because it rested near the border of the Greek world. This inspired a sense of mystery and awe for the Greeks, and emphasized Alexander the Great's vast empire.

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The Statue of Zeus at Olympia

December 6th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

[Historic place, which presently does not exist]

The Statue of Zeus at Olympia carved by the famed Classical sculptor Phidias (5th century BC) circa 435 BC, in present day Greece, is traditionally one of the Seven Wonders of the World. In AD 394, after over 800 years at Olympia, it was taken to Constantinople (modern Istanbul), the capital of the Byzantine Empire. Historians believe it was probably destroyed in an accidental fire.

The seated statue occupied the whole width of the aisle of the temple that was built to house it. According to a contemporary source, it was about 12 metres (~40 feet) tall. "It seems that if Zeus were to stand up," the geographer Strabo noted early in the 1st century BC, "he would unroof the temple." Zeus was carved from ivory (technically the ivory was soaked in a liquid that made it more malleable, so the ivory was probably both shaped and carved as neccesary) and was seated on a magnificent throne of cedarwood, inlaid with ivory, gold, ebony, and precious stones. In Zeus' right hand there was a small statue of Nike, the goddess of victory, and in his left hand, a shining sceptre on which an eagle perched. Visitors like the Roman general Aemilius Paulus, the victor over Macedon, were moved to awe by the godlike majesty and splendor that Phidias had captured.

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Lighthouse of Alexandria in Pharos

December 6th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

[Historic place, which presently does not exist]

Sometimes called the "Pharos of Alexandria" in reference to Pharos the island on which it resided (Also Pharos or Φάρος in greek means lighthouse), the Lighthouse of Alexandria was built in the 3rd century BC and is traditionally considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It ceased operating and was largely destroyed as a result of two earthquakes in the 14th century; its remains were found by divers in 1994 and subsequently more of it was revealed by satellite imaging. Its tower is estimated to have been 134 m (440 ft) high, easily one of the tallest man-made structures on Earth at the time. Built out of blocks of white stone, the tower was made up of three stages: a lower square with a central core, a middle octagonal section, and, at the top, a circular section. At its apex was positioned a mirror which reflected sunlight during the day; a fire was lit at night. As it can be seen from images of the Lighthouse on Roman coins struck by the Alexandrian mint, there were four statues of tritons blowing horns, one on every corner of the building. Also, in the Roman period, there was a statue atop the tower.

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The Mausoleum of Maussollos

December 6th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

[Historic place, which presently does not exist]

The Mausoleum of Maussollos, the Persian satrap of Caria (351 BC, at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum), Turkey), was one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

The word mausoleum came to be used generically for any grand tomb. Mausol-eum meaning in honour of Mausol.

This enormous white marble tomb was built to hold the remains of Mausolus (Greek Μαύσωλος Maúsōlos), a provincial king in the Persian Empire, and his wife, Artemisia. Greek architects Satyrus and Pythius designed the approximately 45-metre-high tomb (135 feet), and four famous Grecian sculptors added an ornamental frieze (decorated band) around its exterior.

(Source: Wikipedia)


Hanging Gardens of Babylon

December 6th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

[Historic place, which presently does not exist]

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon (also known as the Hanging Gardens of Semiramis) and the walls of Babylon (approx. present-day Iraq) were considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World. They were both supposedly built by Nebuchadnezzar II around 600 BC .

The Hanging Gardens are extensively documented by Greek historians such as Strabo and Diodorus Siculus, but otherwise there is little evidence for their existence. Some (circumstantial) evidence gathered at the excavation of the palace at Babylon has been accrued, but does not completely substantiate what look like fanciful descriptions.

Some schools of thought think that through the ages the location may have been confused with gardens that existed at Nineveh as tablets from there clearly showing gardens have been found. Writings on these tablets describe the possible use of something similar to an Archimedes' screw as a process of raising the water to the required height.

(Source: Wikipedia)


Colossus of Rhodes, Greece

December 6th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

The Colossus of Rhodes was a giant statue of the god Helios, erected on the Greek island of Rhodes by Chares of Lindos in the 3rd century BC. It was roughly the same size as the Statue of Liberty in New York, although it stood on a lower platform. It was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

There has been much debate as to whether to rebuild the Colossus. Those for it say it would boost tourism in Rhodes greatly, but those against say it would cost a large amount (over 100 million euros). This idea has been proposed many times since 1970 but, due to lack of money, work has not yet started. The plans for the Colossus have been in the works since 1998, by the Greek-Cypriot artist Nicolaos Gotziamanis.

(Source: Wikipedia)


The Great Pyramid of Giza (Cheops), EGYPT

June 24th, 2005 / / Links: Google Earth, Google Maps, Yahoo! Maps, Virtual Earth / Nearest places
 

The Great Pyramid of Giza, EGYPT

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and last remaining of the Seven Wonders of the World and the most widely recognized pyramid in the world. Though no pharaoh has ever been found buried in an Egyptian pyramid, it is presumed by egyptologists to have been built as a tomb for the Fourth dynasty Egyptian Pharaoh Khufu (also known under his Greek name Cheops), after whom it is often called Khufu's Pyramid or the Pyramid of Khufu.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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